Tag Archives: voip 911

V1 VoIP Provides Lowest e911 Rates for Canada

V1 VoIP offers lowest e911 emergency call rates voip coverage in Canada

The Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission; the Canadian equivalent of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (CRTC) made a ruling in April 2005, that all VoIP providers must provide 911 emergency service. When it comes to our Canadian resellers and their Canadian customers, V1 VoIP has stood up to meet their needs.

Many VoIP customers have ‘basic 911’ service which puts them in touch with a call center that takes down their address and contacts the closest emergency response center. Rather than have an address come up to a 911 responder or however their geographic location is defined, VoIP phone users are identified with their IP address. If calls are disconnected, the VoIP provider gives the customer’s last known address on file.

However if using the enhanced e911 services provided by V1 VoIP, enhanced 911 service sends location information on customers directly to emergency services.

V1 VoIP’s enhanced e911 solution provides nationwide E911 coverage in both the United States and Canada. Voice service providers simply need to establish a SIP trunk to V1 VoIP’s emergency services network. Customers can update and validate their locations in real-time using V1 VoIP’s provisioning interface, which can be incorporated directly into the VSP’s website.

When 911 is dialed, V1 VoIP’s Emergency Routing Service delivers the call to the appropriate PSAP based on the caller’s registered location, ensuring that the correct location data and callback number appear on the dispatcher’s screen.

Contact V1 VoIP now to learn more about our incredible low rates and coverage for e911 for all of Canada as well as the United States.

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Difference Between ANI and ALI Databases

V1 VoIP explains the difference between the automatic number identification ANI and the automatic location identification ALI databases and their uses in voip emergency phone calls

V1 VoIP is committed to offering our VoIP providers, resellers and wholesale agents answers to their questions about emergency phone call information. One question asked often is this:

What is the difference between the ALI and ANI databases and how can they effect emergency response?

The Automatic Number Identification (ANI) is the automatic display at the PSAP of the telephone number associated with the line which called 911. Each telephone number and the physical location to which it corresponds are stored in an Automatic Location Identification (ALI) database, managed by the local exchange carrier.

Imagine you are in a ‘Law and Order’ episode. The 911 operator is looking at the screen, sees the adddress of the caller and says “help is on the way.” In that 911 call, the PSAP uses the ANI to retrieve the caller’s physical address from the ALI database. Additionally, the ANI acts as a callback number should the PSAP lose its connection to the distressed caller. Both ANI and ALI are key capabilities of E911 service.

With traditional E911 service, ALI records are stored in regional ALI databases, and are usually administered by the local exchange carrier (LEC). When a phone’s location changes, the regional ALI database must be revised with new location information which can take up to 48 hours to update.

Due to the capabilities of IP phones, it can be difficult to ensure that the regional ALI is up-to-date. Whereas traditional telephone numbers are static, IP phones can be moved easily, forcing the user to notify a network administrator, who in turn must contact the LEC to update the phone’s location in the regional ALI database. Unfortunately, this process takes time to implement, and may be forgotten entirely by the user.

Additionally, IP phones can relocate to regions served by different ALI databases entirely. A VoIP service provider or enterprise would then need agreements with each LEC to update different regional ALI databases as phones move around the country.

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FCC VoIP E911 Legislation

FCC VoIP e911 legislation for interconnected voip service providers in the United States of America

V1 VoIP takes our emergency calling seriously. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has established a set of rules and regulations that require interconnected VoIP service providers to deliver E911 services to their subscribers. V1 VoIP’s interconnected VoIP service providers connect the IP realm and the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), allowing subscribers to benefit from increased efficiency by routing calls over the internet.

The regulations established by the FCC are mandatory for all interconnected VoIP service providers, and are designed to protect the safety of VoIP users who expect that when they dial 911, emergency responders know exactly where they are and will quickly arrive on-scene.

Specifically, the FCC requires VoIP service providers to do the following:

1. Deliver all 911 calls to the local Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), along with the subscriber’s call back number and location information (where the PSAP is capable of receiving it)

2. Offer subscribers a simple and easy way to update their registered physical location, should it change

3.Inform subscribers of the capabilities and limitations of the E911 service they provide

Click here to view the FCC Rules and Regulations for VoIP 911.

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V1 VoIP Explains the ANI and ALI Databases

V1 VoIP explains the difference between the automatic number identification ANI and the automatic location identification ALI databases and their uses in voip emergency phone callsWhen providing phone service to either businesses or residences, customers need to know important information regarding their ability to make emergency telephone calls. V1 VoIP is committed to offering our VoIP providers, resellers and wholesale agents answers to their questions about emergency information. One question asked often is this:

What is the difference between the ALI and ANI databases and how can they effect emergency response?

The Automatic Number Identification (ANI) is the automatic display at the PSAP of the telephone number associated with the line which called 911. Each telephone number and the physical location to which it corresponds are stored in an Automatic Location Identification (ALI) database, managed by the local exchange carrier.

Imagine you are in a ‘Law and Order’ episode. The 911 operator is looking at the screen, sees the adddress of the caller and says “help is on the way.” In that 911 call, the PSAP uses the ANI to retrieve the caller’s physical address from the ALI database. Additionally, the ANI acts as a callback number should the PSAP lose its connection to the distressed caller. Both ANI and ALI are key capabilities of E911 service.

With traditional E911 service, ALI records are stored in regional ALI databases, and are usually administered by the local exchange carrier (LEC). When a phone’s location changes, the regional ALI database must be revised with new location information which can take up to 48 hours to update.

Due to the capabilities of IP phones, it can be difficult to ensure that the regional ALI is up-to-date. Whereas traditional telephone numbers are static, IP phones can be moved easily, forcing the user to notify a network administrator, who in turn must contact the LEC to update the phone’s location in the regional ALI database. Unfortunately, this process takes time to implement, and may be forgotten entirely by the user.

Additionally, IP phones can relocate to regions served by different ALI databases entirely. A VoIP service provider or enterprise would then need agreements with each LEC to update different regional ALI databases as phones move around the country.

Ultimately, it is difficult for regional ALI databases to stay current with nomadic VoIP users, and there is no guarantee that the VoIP caller’s accurate location information will be available in a crisis.

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