Tag Archives: voip 911

Key Differences Between ANI and ALI Databases

V1 VoIP explains what the key differences are between the automatic number identification ANI and the automatic location identification ALI databases and their uses in voip emergency phone callsV1 VoIP is committed to offering our resellers and wholesale agents the best emergency solutions because you never want to be without in the event of an emergency. A common question asked about emergency services is what is the difference between the ALI and ANI databases and how can they effect emergency response?

Automatic Number Identification (ANI) is the automatic display at the PSAP of the telephone number associated with the line which called 911. Each telephone number and the physical location to which it corresponds are stored in an Automatic Location Identification (ALI) database, managed by the local exchange carrier.

When you call 911 the operator is looking at a screen, sees the adddress of the caller and says “help is on the way.” In that 911 call, the PSAP uses the ANI to retrieve the caller’s physical address from the ALI database. Additionally, the ANI acts as a callback number should the PSAP lose its connection to the distressed caller. Both ANI and ALI are key capabilities of E911 service.

With traditional E911 service, ALI records are stored in regional ALI databases, and are usually administered by the local exchange carrier (LEC). When a phone’s location changes, the regional ALI database must be revised with new location information which can take up to 48 hours to update.

Due to the capabilities of IP phones, it can be difficult to ensure that the regional ALI is up-to-date. Whereas traditional telephone numbers are static, IP phones can be moved easily, forcing the user to notify a network administrator, who in turn must contact the LEC to update the phone’s location in the regional ALI database. Unfortunately, this process takes time to implement, and may be forgotten entirely by the user.

Additionally, IP phones can relocate to regions served by different ALI databases entirely. A VoIP service provider or enterprise would then need agreements with each LEC to update different regional ALI databases as phones move around the country.

Ultimately, it is difficult for regional ALI databases to stay current with nomadic VoIP users, and there is no guarantee that the VoIP caller’s accurate location information will be available in a crisis.

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ANI and ALI Databases for New VoIP Resellers

V1 VoIP explains the importance of automatic number identification ANI and the automatic location identification ALI databases and their uses in voip emergency phone calls

As a new V1 VoIP reseller, you are going to hear a lot about ANI and ALI databases. But as a new reseller, you may not know what they are. And they are important as they relate to your emergency telephone needs. Let V1 VoIP explain:

What is the difference between the ALI and ANI databases and how can they effect emergency response?

The Automatic Number Identification (ANI) is the automatic display at the PSAP of the telephone number associated with the line which called 911. Each telephone number and the physical location to which it corresponds are stored in an Automatic Location Identification (ALI) database, managed by the local exchange carrier.

Let’s say you are watching an episode of Fox’s drama ‘911’. The emergency operator is looking at the screen and sees the adddress of the caller and says “help is on the way.” In that 911 call, the PSAP uses the ANI to retrieve the caller’s physical address from the ALI database. Additionally, the ANI acts as a callback number should the PSAP lose its connection to the distressed caller. Both ANI and ALI are key capabilities of E911 service.

With traditional E911 service, ALI records are stored in regional ALI databases, and are usually administered by the local exchange carrier (LEC). When a phone’s location changes, the regional ALI database must be revised with new location information which can take up to 48 hours to update.

Due to the capabilities of IP phones, it can be difficult to ensure that the regional ALI is up-to-date. Whereas traditional telephone numbers are static, IP phones can be moved easily, forcing the user to notify a network administrator, who in turn must contact the LEC to update the phone’s location in the regional ALI database. Unfortunately, this process takes time to implement, and may be forgotten entirely by the user.

Additionally, IP phones can relocate to regions served by different ALI databases entirely. A VoIP service provider or enterprise would then need agreements with each LEC to update different regional ALI databases as phones move around the country.

Ultimately, it is difficult for regional ALI databases to stay current with nomadic VoIP users, and there is no guarantee that the VoIP caller’s accurate location information will be available in a crisis.

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Feel Safe in an Emergency with V1 VoIP E911

E911 stands for “Enhanced 911”, which is the V1 VoIP service for making 911 calls over an Internet connection instead of over a standard wireline or cellular tower routing system. Beginning in 2005 all VoIP providers have had standard E911 capabilities included in all VoIP plans. So, even if you are not with V1 VoIP, you can be confident that you will have a reliable 911 service at all times.

Because VoIP E911 is not quite the same as regular 911 service with landline providers, 911 operators cannot automatically trace an E911 number to the physical location from which the call originated as they can with traditional 911 services. When a 911 call is made from a traditional wire landline, 911 operators are able to trace the call to the physical location from which the call originates. i.e. your home or office. When a 911 call is made from a cell phone, the cellular towers create a triangular mapping system to find the location of the caller. VoIP calls work a little differently from both of these technologies.

Many people don’t really understand the actual limitations of VoIP E911 and so have an unnecessary amount of anxiety about it. VoIP calls are not traceable to physical locations. So, when a customer gets VoIP service, they need to register their VoIP phone number with their home or office address. This way the 911 operator will be able to see what physical address the VoIP phone number is connected to.

V1 VoIP providers instruct resellers to update their customers’ registered address any time they register for service and/or move to a new address so that emergency workers don’t show up at the wrong house during an emergency. And when a VoIP customer wants to make calls through their VoIP number when they are traveling, VoIP providers recommend that the user changes their E911 registered address to the address that you are staying at, whether that is a hotel or relative’s home.

Because VoIP service depends on a reliable Internet connection, it also depends on a reliable energy source. This means that in the event of inclement weather or other power outage situations, you should be prepared with a back-up power source for your Internet connection like a battery plug-in, or a generator if you expect long periods of power outage.

Accidents may happen while you travel, or in the comfort of your own home. Emergencies can’t be predicted, but having a lifesaver just a dial away with VoIP is all the assurance that you need. No one wants to make a 911 call, but if an emergency does occur, users can feel safe with V1 VoIP E911.

 

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ANI and ALI Database Differences

V1 VoIP answers questions about emergency information locations and the differences between ANI and ALI databases

What is the difference between the ALI and ANI databases and how can they effect emergency response?

The Automatic Number Identification (ANI) is the automatic display at the PSAP of the telephone number associated with the line which called 911. Each telephone number and the physical location to which it corresponds are stored in an Automatic Location Identification (ALI) database, managed by the local exchange carrier.

When providing phone service to either businesses or residences, customers need to know important information regarding their ability to make emergency telephone calls. V1 VoIP is committed to offering our VoIP providers, resellers and wholesale agents answers to their questions about emergency information.

Let’s say someone calls 911. The 911 operater will answer the call, look at their monitor, see the adddress of the caller and says “help is on the way.” In that 911 call, the PSAP uses the ANI to retrieve the caller’s physical address from the ALI database. Additionally, the ANI acts as a callback number should the PSAP lose its connection to the distressed caller. Both ANI and ALI are key capabilities of E911 service.

With traditional E911 service, ALI records are stored in regional ALI databases, and are usually administered by the local exchange carrier (LEC). When a phone’s location changes, the regional ALI database must be revised with new location information which can take up to 48 hours to update.

Due to the capabilities of cellular and IP phones, it can be difficult to ensure that the regional ALI is up-to-date. Whereas traditional telephone numbers are static, IP phones can be moved easily, forcing the user to notify a network administrator, who in turn must contact the LEC to update the phone’s location in the regional ALI database. Unfortunately, this process takes time to implement, and may be forgotten entirely by the user.

Additionally, IP phones can relocate to regions served by different ALI databases entirely. A VoIP service provider or enterprise would then need agreements with each LEC to update different regional ALI databases as phones move around the country.

Ultimately, it is difficult for regional ALI databases to stay current with nomadic VoIP users, and there is no guarantee that the VoIP caller’s accurate location information will be available in a crisis.

By checking this box, I agree to V1 VoIP's Terms and Conditions